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Media

Chainlink Q&A Sees Blockpass Discuss DeFi

Matthew Warner | April 2021

Last week, Blockpass CEO Adam Vaziri took part in a Q&A session with Chainlink Live with host Andy Boyan, researcher and writer at Chainlink Labs. Over the 40 minute session Boyan and Vaziri discussed the DeFi ecosystem, with Boyan asking Vaziri about his background, Blockpass, particular benefits and use cases, the intersection of Blockpass and Chainlink and their work together, and more. After Boyan’s questions he also put forward a couple from the live chat that was going on alongside the talk.

To watch the video of the interview you can click here to see the Q&A on the Chainlink YouTube channel but a transcript of the conversation can be found below.

 

Andy Boyan  

I’m here to do a q&a and get to know Blockpass with Adam Vaziri, CEO of Blockpass. We’re going to give people a few minutes to come in before we get started into the meat of the conversation, but before we do, Adam, how you doing man? 

 

Adam Vaziri  

I’m alright thanks. Yeah, 

 

Andy Boyan  

You have a big old background of your website and everything ready to go. I like it. 

 

Adam Vaziri  

Yeah, definitely. 

 

Andy Boyan  

Alright, I think we are going. We do see people in the youtube so let’s start a little bit at least with an introduction. Here’s what we’re gonna do today, we’re just going to talk a little bit about Blockpass, what you do, what you offer, how it ties into smart contracts and DeFi, and how you guys use Chainlink, how we work together, and then a little bit of a larger conversation about KYC and identity and smart contracts and crypto because that’s a juicy topic and a lot of fun to talk about. I’m really glad to have you here. We talked briefly a couple days ago but it’s nice to connect again and get into some of this stuff, so why don’t you introduce yourself and your journey into crypto and DeFi and how you got started.

 

Adam Vaziri  

Yeah, sure. Well, Thanks a lot for having us today and it’s really a pleasure to be working with Chainlink so collaboratively and strategically in our mission. So myself, my background is actually as a lawyer. I qualified back in 2010, and had been working, initially in tech, and then discovered crypto back in 2013. And then, you know, at that point, I was pretty much the only lawyer in Europe really focussing on the area. And I’ve been through quite a lot of experience – experiences with clients, as a lawyer, and the problems that they encountered in the early stages of crypto when they were trying to figure out whether something was compliant or not but the issue was the regulatory environment was not particularly clear because regulators and law makers will try to catch up with even just defining these instruments and the activities involved with these instruments. So, there was a period of time where there was some uncertainty. And what I noticed was that there is this great sense of innovation driving direct access to financial services and all the great things that we all love about crypto. But from my experiences as a regulatory lawyer, I saw that, obviously, there would be a point where it would be necessary to combine this kind kind of permissionless innovation with the reality of the laws that kind of surround us in our day to day living. So, how do you connect the mainstream world and the crypto world as you know they are kind of almost independent in some regards, but they intersect. And as you can see, now you know even today with Coinbase is listing, that that is becoming less of an intersection, but more than immersion between those two, two worlds. So, you know, for me, that is really the genesis of Blockpass is to enable businesses to gain access – crypto businesses –  to gain access to affordable, which is a crucial aspect, to KYC and AML, but at a high quality, so that they know that, for convenience, you know that they don’t have to think, oh, how do I comply, they don’t have to do any of that hard work, they can just simply, in a few moments, create an account and comply, essentially, the way it is, and not really think about all of these complications surrounding how to comply. You know, how to comply is, is a minefield and requires specialists, and requires lawyers, compliance offices, regulators, and all of that increases your costs are going to market.

 

Andy Boyan  

I agree I talked to retail friends – they come to me and they say okay how do I get involved. That’s the first question like, What do I need to – what video do I need to watch, where do I go to buy, how do I start? But then when I got a friend who’s a mortgage broker and the first thing he said to me when he found that I worked in the industry, he’s like, is this legal – like his questions set was completely different. It wasn’t how do I get started, it was is this legal, and in my experience in the FinTech world, I brought out, you know, blockchain and crypto as a payments company, and the compliance officer just said, ‘we can’t’ – just, we don’t have the resources right now it wasn’t whether or not it was legal, it was, we don’t have the infrastructure, or the people who understand it well enough we can go lobby and like do everything that needs to be done at that time. So there’s a real difference between like an enterprise, you know, a b2b sort of tech business or anybody in industry, and, you know, your average retail user so it’s great to hear like that that’s kind of what Blockpass is about. 

 

Adam Vaziri  

Yeah, I mean, it’s just, I mean, that’s one side if you weren’t on the coin; the other side is the individual. So, you as an individual, in kind of your day to day environment of accessing services, you know, you have this experience of permissionless where you can go access anything in crypto – it almost gives you a sense of freedom. And the interesting thing is when you think about financial services, the innovation of FinTech is, we view financial services to be somewhat clunky and that there’s a high lock-in so it’s difficult to move from one vendor to the other, and Fintech is like – how do we make that easier for people to access financial services, potentially, but crypto is – take away all of the friction – and it’s the Wild West. So, for me, what I want to ensure also is that the user has an incredible experience of accessing services. And to me, one of the things I found like almost structurally deficient, was the way that financial services verify users, and it’s always been the case that the user has to go through protracted compliance process in order to access what may be a nominally used account, they may only be trading $100 but they have to go through an extensive due diligence process, and this results in a lot of friction for users and from our point of view, it’s completely unacceptable to allow for the same degree of friction within crypto as crypto starts to have to comply. And so that’s what Blockpass is about – you give the user the single identity and a passport – a digital passport, that they can reuse across all the blockchain services, and that’s another facet to the project, there is another facet of course. Those are two of the main facets of the project

 

Andy Boyan  

To help projects to be compliant, when they want to be compliant, and to make it, make them not lose users and when I think about signing up for an exchange, for example, I can download an app on my phone. And then I need some, I need some time to get set up, and users – I do this – users make that judgement call: do I have time right now to do this? Do I care enough to sign up for this process? So you KYC providers like as an API you can sell your service essentially to these FinTech or DeFi projects that help them be compliant with KYC in an easy onboarding sort of way. Yeah. Can you tell us a little bit about Blockpass specifically like what are some of your differentiating project products and how do you guys kind of stand out in the space.

 

Adam Vaziri  

I mean, I think the best way of comparing Blockpass, is with other user-centric KYC vendors in the market. So you could, broadly speaking the KYC market is a very big market. Now you have brand names like Onfido, Comply Advantage, some of the other big names in the industry. But that’s not who we are competing with essentially because that’s – these are effectively the data pipes in the industry. What we are trying to do is give people a user centric application so they have an identity that they can be shared. And there are not many vendors in fact in the market that offer that. So we’re in a somewhat of a green field at the moment with Blockpass. So, there are other vendors such as Fractal, Synapse and a few others, but to all intents and purposes it is a very green field.

 

Andy Boyan  

Yeah, I saw some things on your website about enabling people who don’t have native access to identity. I’m in the states and so identity is like a basic part of  the rights that I take for granted. I can get a government ID, my name is on registries everywhere, I have a long history, but that’s not always the case for everybody. Can you talk a little bit about that and how that the value you see there.

 

Adam Vaziri  

Well, what we’re talking about is the positioning of Blockpass is about remote access. And so, of course, it – the prerequisite of accessing, is that you have documentation. But you may not be able to rely upon certain documentation. So for instance, if you were a regulated, US company, and you wanted to onboard someone from say, Indonesia, then you would need to feel comfortable to remotely onboard that individual and to have comfort in the documents that they are supplying. And, I mean, there are instances where people do not have documentation but you’re talking about, highly marginalized set of individuals in the world. And for that, the only solution in that regard, unfortunately, is a form of self-sovereign identity that they can use with permissionless access to blockchain. If the government has failed to provide them with the most basic documents, it seems that that’s the only recourse that they do have, and that’s a really interesting, amazing facet of blockchain in general, is that it doesn’t discriminate, essentially, between users and every user can create reputation simply by transacting and their relationship, essentially, with other service providers may become akin to someone who is fully verified in the United States market, but to be honest, I think, you know, dealing with the unbanked is something only really a service like DeFi may be able to offer. Fully regulated services will struggle, absolutely, to be able to service an undocumented set of customers.

 

Andy Boyan  

So, cryptocurrency has a history of pseudonymity and trying to get anonymity, at least in transactions right – each address is synonymous, not necessarily associated. What do you do the role of KYC and AML playing into the crypto landscape; it’s got this history but not necessarily this future – how do those things interact in your opinion?

 

Adam Vaziri  

The way I view it is like, on one side there is the necessity, the necessity of compliance, which is not really a choice, it’s an obligation and that’s just the burden of living in the world that we live in. That’s one thing. And so the question is, how can you address those requirements in the least friction-based manner? How can you make it cost effective, fast, for a user to onboard? how can you make it cost effective for the business to continually onboard these users. So, like, that’s really one of the big problems that we’re trying to address. But, on the other side of it is, you know, thinking about what are the other issues that are associated with KYC which is identity fraud. You know there, I’ve seen from my own experience, numerous companies fall victim to identity fraud and the result is that they have actually had to go out of business entirely. And that’s not really a nice prospect for a business. So, you know, although we talk about trustlessness in crypto, there is still some reliance on users, and whether or not you can trust them. And for that you need to be able to rely upon those users being who they say they are because, they frankly could just be, you know, a botnet, and that doesn’t really have any benefit for the ecosystem as a whole.

 

Andy Boyan  

Right, it doesn’t have benefit for the product of course – you’ve got fake users and fake volumes and then of course the industry as a whole those are all those are not helpful metrics either. Yeah you know I think about anonymity and pseudonymity and KYC in terms of choice like it’s user choice you can go full anon, but most people don’t. And when we get towards these mass adoption, and you know you’ve got to turn your crypto into a card product – payment card products – so you can make payments at a store or whatever, a lot of people are going to opt for the easy, easy path, and to be able to use that for payments and so, to give people a choice just make sense to me, and to make sure those are compliant as well of course. So, part of why we’re here is the integration with Chainlink as a Chainlink data provider, now your KYC and AML API is essentially can be called to smart contracts and smart contracts can use those as part of the Chainlink oracle process. So what are some of the use cases why a smart contract, a DAP, or DeFi would want to call KYC like what are some of the ways they can use this.

 

Adam Vaziri  

Well, I mean this the thing that I am most excited about is, I mean, to your point about pseudoanonymity and choice – this is one of the key things that I think we can achieve, working in DeFi, because essentially what we’re talking about is KYC within the context of DeFi. The way that we can achieve that is Blockpass is essentially an identity custodian if you think of it, similar to a bank, but for identity: the user gets verified with us and then we relay that message on the blockchain by linking that message of what they are verified about in that message itself. So, you have the address of that person which in a sense is a pseudoanonymous identifier on the blockchain. And then you have a message associated with that identifier, and that message – maybe this person has gone through full KYC and has been fully identified where it could be simply, this person is not a minor, for instance. So whatever the message is we can relay the message, and the way that we can relay the message is through a Chainlink node to a decentralized application. And so the reason why that’s interesting at all is that the application, which is the one that’s consuming the data, is the one that doesn’t have to collect any personal data -it doesn’t have to ask the person please can you send me a photo of the passport, or anything of the sort, that is only stored in one place. And then the verification is complete and the verification is then sent via message, and like that you minimize the risk of dispersing your data all across the internet and having to deal with so many different vendors and differing levels of security across all of those vendors, and even these vendors themselves they, they don’t really want to engage in having to collect personal data, but this has never been done before, let’s be clear about that. This is really, actually, you know, a lot of people talk about, that there is a paradox between data protection on one side and anti money laundering on the other side because in an anti money laundering world you have to collect data, and data protection is about minimizing or essentially eliminating the collection of data – so these two worlds collide, but this is a way actually of seeking a compromise through technology. And this has only been possible today because of DeFi, because of us, as Blockpass acting as the data custodian and because of a service like Chainlink. Those three elements make this possible and I think, you know to put it in context, you talk about a use case – one of the primary use cases that we are finding is that it’s within the lending market, that people are most interested in exploring. How can you interact with a real person on the blockchain without knowing who they are, and you want to know they’re real, because you’re going to lend the money, but you don’t necessarily want to know who they are, because you don’t want to collect the data. So how can you address those two imperatives. It’s only possible in the way that we have delivered this service.

 

Andy Boyan  

Yeah, you know fintechs and startups, if you’ve got a lean team, you’ve got five people. Do you want to spend a sixth of your budget on a sixth person to do compliance and do the record keeping and hold passport photos and all that. No, no way, like that’s just a huge blocker to scaling anything or getting off the ground. So the service is great for KYC – is well somebody else can do that. If I’m running a startup I don’t have to custody that I don’t have to worry about it I can just report back. Yes, this person passes or no they don’t. I don’t even need to know why. And KYC provider can go and say, like, well, do you need to check them against an OFAC list, a PEP list or, or any of these you know various lists that need to be checked. Or as you said, are they a minor – are they allowed to get a card with us or, or you know lending and things like that, so it makes sense in terms of, you know, the sort of plug and play, scaling capabilities as well. And so, to see that now in some DeFi protocols is really interesting as more DeFi protocols want to build on the, on the blockchain and want to have smart contracts, but they also want to be compliant in whatever regulatory capacity. And we talked a little bit about this, but how does Chainlink help Blockpass expand this product because you guys have an existing product already that you’re serving with some wallets and, and some other services – Chainlink now as a node. What do you guys see as the future of being able to do service through the Chainlink network?

 

Adam Vaziri  

Yeah. As I mentioned, in order for us to be able to create this service, we need to have someone that’s delivering the result on the blockchain, and it’s not going to be us – like we’re not in a position that we want to reinvent the wheel. So, and also this culture of blockchain is about composability and collaboration. So from our point of view, we want to bring the data to Chainlink, and then Chainlink is the one that has the standards around delivery of the data to the one who wants to consume the data. And, you know, that, the magic of it, in my opinion, is that the person who consumes the data, so says, ‘Okay, I just want to know that these users arriving at my DeFi app, that they are say, not from the United States or over 18’ or whatever that criteria is – they just point that site to the relevant Chainlink node, which is getting the data from Blockpass, and boom, they’re compliant and, like, for me, from my point of view, the greatness of it is that they don’t even have to interact with us. They don’t have to even talk to anyone at Blockpass, they just go straight to the data pipe, and they get what they want. And to me that is unheard of. And for me that creates a new phenomenon within at least the reg tech market which is of course the component of Blockpass – of what we’re really trying to achieve.

 

Andy Boyan  

Yeah, that’s really interesting. Sergey Nazarov, our founder, talks about the microservices architecture, which is, you know, we’ll bring an Oracle Service to anybody, help anybody get set up with Chainlink, and then go focus really hard on making sure that Chainlink is the best it can be, and you don’t have to worry about that. It’s a very similar model to what you’ve got here and what we have seen in FinTech in tech industries these sort of plug and play – that’s why API’s are successful right, it’s because it lets people plug and play, and specialize in this really interesting way. But then you break out this really cool idea about self-serve regtech models, which, you know, self serve like, for Chainlink Oracles – we’ll get a message, you’ll see a message in the telegram, which will say, ‘hey I integrated your Chainlink oracles into my protocol, what do I do next?’ and we say oh okay we got a user – great, let’s help you! And that’s gonna start happening right like, hey, we just integrated your KYC should we talk to anybody, or, or what? And that is like a mind blowing model, especially in terms of compliance like compliance officers that’s not just what they do it’s about doing your due diligence and doing your homework in an analogue way, because they’ve always done it that way right that’s what that’s what they do. And there’s good reasons for that so yeah you just open the can of worms here and I’m thinking about banks, full of compliance officers and lawyers trying to figure out is, is this okay how’s this gonna work? Have you had any conversations with the compliance folks in other industries, who are thinking about this kind of thing like, how do they respond to this idea.

 

Adam Vaziri  

Well, I mean, of course we’re dealing with compliance officers with regards to our customers that we deal with, and how they deal with Blockpass, but really this is the cutting edge – what I’m describing with you, with regards to what we’re doing with Chainlink. But maybe it’s best I describe the use case that we have a president, for which we have a partner, the name of the partner is EasyFi, and you may have seen press releases about our partnership with them. But what they are offering, essentially, is the ability to receive a loan from a DeFi project in a manner that’s under collateralized, so most of them being at the moment in DeFi is over collateralized and what their position is is we can offer under collateralized loans, and the way that they can do that is to ensure that the people who are borrowing money from them, aum, that when they borrow the money that they have already been verified. And so from my point of view is the reason they’re relying upon Blockpass is because it’s a necessity to their go-to-market, go-to-market strategy, it’s not ‘what does their compliance officer, think about it’, it’s they want to deliver this product into the market, and they need Blockpass in order to deliver that product to the market so it’s a very different position to be in because mostly when you’re dealing with compliance officers in firms, they’re not thinking about the go-to-market strategy. And so that’s a very big difference and, you know, the way I view compliance is, it has to be have a positive role to play in the business and not be something that’s shunned upon, that is viewed to be somewhat negative within the business as a cost center – these kind of approaches, because as soon as you have that psychological approach almost to that activity or department of your business, then you sideline it, and you don’t actually view it to have benefit. You do it as an obligation, whereas in this situation the reason they need to rely on Blockpass, is because if it turns out that it was a botnet army, you know it came along to borrow the cash, they have no recourse against those bots, right.But the identification layer ensures that they can rely upon the addresses that they receive, essentially, and so in the event that if it were to be a case of default, there will be some recourse against those users. And so this is, this is about developing new products, in a sense, and so it, you know, this solution is part of it, is a necessity in order to be able to deliver that product to the market.

 

Andy Boyan  

That makes sense. So speaking of DeFi, TBL is growing, DeFi as you know it just completely exploded from last year. But if you take a look at crypto that’s on the sidelines, that’s not earning yield in DeFi people that are just holding crypto let alone traditional but just holding crypto is still massive. What do you see as the tipping point? What’s going to make some holders turn into DeFi users? Is KYC and, you know the answer and some more of these regulated solutions or compliant solutions I should say, or what do you think about that?

 

Adam Vaziri  

Well, I’m not an expert in that area but just my personal opinion, I think, you know people love to experiment, that’s for sure. But experimentation has a cost associated with it. Everyone would love to have a go, you know, Uniswap and, make a DAO, but if it’s going to cost you $100 to play around with $100 it’s probably not worth your while. So, Gas costs at the moment, at least within Etherium, presents a challenge surrounding people wanting to experiment and so the result of Gas costs is, essentially centralization, because when it costs you, $100 to do a $100 transaction then that’s not very logical. So, you know, and then that’s why you see the likes of Binance Smart Chain and Polygon gaining success because there is a desire, you can see a pent up desire to really experiment in DeFi and get involved, but there’s a lot of resistance within the technical limitations at present, but then, you know when you cross over onto the other side, so to speak, you have to understand what are the limitations of that particular ecosystem. Yeah, I mean, this is, you know, they’re kind of like aping in on DeFi… aping in on DeFi, you know, as you know I test my code in production. This kind of means that exists within DeFi. These people need to understand that there are risks, those risks are different depending on the platform that you’re using. And it’s not because you shifted over to another platform that doesn’t have gas fees, and suddenly you’re insulated from the from the risks of those platforms because those platforms may have different risks, but I think, to me it’s, if people are in DeFi, it’s because they have a desire for that experimentation and the creativity that comes with all of that. I think there are limitations around how accessible some of those products are, you know, I don’t know the average person if they’re going to want to do a 100x for swapping contract on DYDX, you know that those kinds of things like, that’s more like for professional traders, I would say that. I do think that there is definitely a pent up desire and once Gas is addressed in some, some manner, or form then you’ll see that, you know that will come to surface as well.

 

Andy Boyan  

Great, thank you. I’m gonna turn to the YouTube questions we actually have a couple now so I want to throw these to you, Adam. What are the steps you follow with Blockpass – or not you personally – but what are the steps that Blockpass follows as far as to validate someone’s identity and how do you prevent spoofs?

 

Adam Vaziri  

Yeah, I see a really great question. For us, it’s not for us to decide what business wants to do, the steps that they want to take take to validate an identity. What we do is we have a set of base level requirements for validating an identity, and then the business on top can add their additional requirements. So we give the business a kind of comprehensive dashboard where they, they receive the automated checks that we perform, but in addition to that perform additional checks on the user if they so wish, but it’s different layers. The first layer is the validation of the document that they provide. In Blockpass, you cannot upload a document into the system. That prevents the most easy form of fraud, which is just buying fake documents, which, you know, you can search online on Google now and you could buy some. And so, you know, having KYC with an upload function to me is, is not KYC is it’s, frankly, a joke. And so, you have to take a live photograph. That then means the image taken is of a physical document . It has to be a physical document. At the point that it’s taken of a physical document, we have a forensic analysis tool, which then analyzes the document to determine whether it is authentic or not, and that is a check against government templates of the same documents, whether there’s are any signs of tampering of the document, whether it be digital or physical tampering of the documents. There are all sorts of different ways that fraudsters will try to fabricate documents and so, this system is a very agile system to detect any anomalies. Then after you – when you’re done that, that data is extracted through standardized fields, and we validate that data against other components within the document itself so there is a zone in the document that we extract and is validated against the zones within the visual zone within a document – that’s the document authentication. Then we have the face match component. So we, we want to know that if that person is submitting an application, they are in fact, the owner of that physical document. To do that we need to know that their face is the same as that as that, as presented on the document. And again, it has to be a live image that’s taken at the time. Now, one of the key things about Blockpass is we have a very clever remediation system so if at any point we see that there seems to be some issue surrounding the image, we can always ask the user to take another photograph of themselves, so they don’t have to go through the whole process again, but they can just stop and say, ‘it seems that you know there was low light settings’ or something like that. Please take another photo. So, you’re always in an incremental step in building your identity. You’re never having to redo the whole thing – you’re incrementally building building your identity, and the more use Blockpass the stronger your identity becomes: you build reputation within that system. And even today, businesses can rely upon users that have connected to multiple businesses because they have more credibility, than someone that has only connected to one. So those are some of the elements. We also have an anti-money laundering, adverse media sanctions screening system that will do the screening necessary to ensure that a person isn’t connected with any of those required lists, and then that’s reflected in the user’s profile for the business to see. So, you know that there are many other elements you also have proof of address check. We have the ability to expire and re-verify persons periodically, but one of the key components is making sure from the outset that the document is authenticated, the person is biometrically authenticated, and that that person has a reputation in the system. Those are the three elements.

 

Andy Boyan  

For our wrap up question. – one user questioned about the future for the PASS Token but I also want to ask you just about your roadmap for Blockpass like what are you guys looking at doing in the future. How’s the PASS Token involved, what’s kind of your, your next steps as you look forward to some of this exciting stuff.

 

Adam Vaziri  

Definitely. This is the thing that we’re most excited about. As a project, you know, we started this project back in… gosh, it’s nearly four years now, and it’s been a long time to build amazing technology; you know anyone who thinks you can just create a great product in six months is joking. The great product takes time. It takes a real serious product that can transform the market. It takes time, effort, experience, and that’s the dedication that we’ve put into Blockpass. It’s been a grueling set of four years to ensure that we can deliver something that is transformative for the market. And you can see it today, you can use it today, it’s not vaporware, it’s real and it’s, it’s been out there in the market and tried and tested it with over 100,000 users that are using it presently. So building a fantastic application that’s transformative, is the first step. The second step is, how do you make this system – the areas that I was talking about which is more the game theory of reputation – how you bring those elements into the application? So when I was talking earlier about reputation that you, you build a reputation. You know, everyone said, you have a reputation, you build a reputation for your use, but you can acquire your reputation by staking – by staking your reputation, using PASS tokens, you essentially say to the world that you can be trusted. And these are some of the utility functions that we’ll be introducing within Blockpass. For us, it’s about how do you leverage PASS tokens to give instant trust to other persons that may need to rely on your identity. And these are some of the utilities that you will see, but it’s also rewarding you when you use PASS tokens, so you’re hear in the forthcoming months about how we reward users for going through the process of sharing their data with merchants, etc, and it’s what we call the PASS Rewards scheme, but there is a, there’s another level to it which we call the PASS protocol, and the protocol is really about Blockpass etc that exists in this current state, as an application, with these incentive layers within it, to ensure people are trustworthy. Then data that’s created and the transmission of data, if you went on-chain, requires the ability for that data to be transacted, and that’s where PASS token comes in. So, for instance, in a situation where data is delivered by Chainlink, the consumption of the data to Chainlink may involve PASS tokens too. So, there are elements to it, where we are using PASS tokens as a data transmission system, but that is, if you weren’t really the third chapter of this project. First Chapter is spending four years building the best application the market has ever seen. The second is how do we create the correct incentives to ensure people can achieve instant trust, and the third is how can we ensure data transmission for verified credentials, and that’s where the third chapter of this project.

 

Andy Boyan  

Fantastic. We had one more quick question of PASS staking, which I think you cover in there, so that is coming in the coming months. I won’t ask you ‘when’s staking’, because that’s what everyone asks, as well, but it’s been great to talk to you, Adam, learn about Blockpass, how you guys are bringing automation and KYC to smart contracts through Chainlink and what you’ve done – 100,000 users already very impressive. I’ve done a lot of research on KYC solutions so I was really excited to talk to you and get to know about Blockpass as well. Where can our viewers and our community get a hold of you, learn more about Blockpass? 

 

Adam Vaziri  

Yeah definitely so thanks a lot Andy and, you know, as I said from the beginning, it is fantastic to have a strategic collaboration with Chainlink, between Chainlink and Blockpas. You can find out more about Blockpass, but just go to our website, Blockpass.org – all of the information is there. If you’re looking to onboard, you can create a business account; if you’re a user, create a user account, head over to the Marketplace to find out where you can use your reusable identity. Really that’s it and we look forward to welcoming you to the Blockpass community. 

 

Andy Boyan

Yeah, I’ll have those in the show notes down below so if you’re watching this video you can click through and check out their social properties. Big thanks to Adam for coming and for the members of your team who contributed and the Chainlink Labs team as well who I have running the YouTube boards and things like that. Again, my name is Andy Boyan with Chainlink Labs, this has been Chainlink live with Blockpass. Find out more about them, like and subscribe to the Chainlink YouTube channel and we’ll talk to you guys later. Thanks Adam. Bye.

 

Adam Vaziri

Thanks bye.